SEXUAL HEALTH

4 Books That Will Change How You Perceive Your Menstrual Cycle

Ohnut: The Solution For Discomfort During Penetrative Sex

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4 Books That Will Change How You Perceive Your Menstrual Cycle

Emily Sauer accepted for a decade that sex would always be physically uncomfortable for her. One day she hit rock bottom and refused to do nothing anymore.

Looking for ways to solve this problem she invented Ohnut. She came up with the idea of putting a doughnut on her partner’s penis as a buffer between his body and hers. Although the idea of the doughnut was a bit messy, building a wearable that could help her and her partner decide how far the penetration could go sounded like a great idea, and so Ohnut was born.

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4 Books That Will Change How You Perceive Your Menstrual Cycle

4 Books That Will Change How You Perceive Your Menstrual Cycle

Image
Ohnut is the revolutionary buffer that allows couples to explore comfortable penetration depths during sex. Its linking feature gives you the possibility to stack 1 to 4 rings around the base of your partner’s penis or your favorite self-pleasure toy and voilà.

4 Books That Will Change How You Perceive Your Menstrual Cycle

4 Books That Will Change How You Perceive Your Menstrual Cycle

4 Books That Will Change How You Perceive Your Menstrual Cycle

SEXUAL HEALTH

Ohnut: The Solution For Discomfort During Penetrative Sex

SHARE:

Image

Emily Sauer accepted for a decade that sex would always be physically uncomfortable for her. One day she hit rock bottom and refused to do nothing anymore.

Looking for ways to solve this problem she invented Ohnut. She came up with the idea of putting a doughnut on her partner’s penis as a buffer between his body and hers. Although the idea of the doughnut was a bit messy, building a wearable that could help her and her partner decide how far the penetration could go sounded like a great idea, and so Ohnut was born.

Image
Ohnut is the revolutionary buffer that allows couples to explore comfortable penetration depths during sex. Its linking feature gives you the possibility to stack 1 to 4 rings around the base of your partner’s penis or your favorite self-pleasure toy and voilà.
Image
In Conversation with Emily Sauer
Q
Was there a pivotal time in your life that made you decide to stop having painful sex?
A

When I started looking for products, there were none that understood the experience I was going through. After finding essentially nothing, I had no one to blame but myself, so for the 10 years I was experiencing it I stopped trying to advocate for myself.

Just before I created Ohnut, I was in a relationship in which every time that sex was painful it was a reminder to me that I wasn’t the person I thought I was or the partner I wanted to be and I lost every sense of self that I took pride in.

Fortunately, we were dedicated to trying to make it work and in that process the idea of customizing penetration depth was really the only option that I had. And so, when I created Ohnut and used it, I suddenly had this deep sense of liberation, because when suddenly that pain went away it was as if with it came a permission to feel good.

Ultimately, it was that moment of liberation that gave me the permission to talk about my experience.

“ It’s important to mention that 75% of people will have painful sex during their lifetime and less than half speak about it with their partner. ”
Q
You have just talked a bit about this, but could you tell us more about how not having painful sex has changed your relationship with your sexuality?
A

I learned that to deny the fact that sex is complicated is to deny the fact that we’re humans.

Sex is not just a physical experience. My mental health, my self-esteem, my quality of life are deeply impacted by my sexual existence and the other way around. I think that it is deeply unfortunate that our society and medical institutions don’t feel the same way.

In my relationships after I began to use Ohnut, there was no way I was entering into a relationship where the person didn’t know I was having pain during sex. This made it so that from that moment on there was an open dialogue not only about my body but also about my partner’s body.

All of a sudden, when I was able to express my insecurities and my concerns, this created room for my partner to also say, ‘This is what I am trying to work on and this is what might not work well’, and it opened up the possibility for both of us to be human in the bedroom, rather than having to perform.

Q
What do you think keeps people from talking about their discomfort during sex?
A

It’s important to mention that 75% of people will have painful sex during their lifetime and less than half speak about it with their partner.

I think that when you look for products that can solve it and there aren’t, you go to a doctor and they cannot give you a solution, you look at media and they are only talking about orgasms and not
about this, you feel that you are the only one experiencing it. I mean, how are we supposed to feel about ourselves when this is what we see around us?

All of this makes it really hard for people to know that it is actually a shared experience and,
ultimately, to speak about it.

To deny the fact that sex is complicated is to deny the fact that we’re humans. ” 
Q
What would you say to women reading this and who are experiencing pain during sex?
A

After a decade of not advocating for myself, I developed the habit of being silent in the bedroom and outside of it. To this day I don’t always say something when sex is painful because it’s still hard for me, and I feel really bad about it.

I would like to tell them that what they are experiencing is not uncommon and the important thing is that there are people that can help them, so they don’t have to feel in this way forever.

Q
In your opinion, what steps does society need to take to move in the right direction regarding female sexuality?
A
I think it is going to take a long time for systemic change to happen so it’s up to individuals to become educated and to advocate for themselves.
Have your needs met, a toolkit for more comfortable sex
Image
Ohnut, a wearable for when penetrative sex feels too deep.
SHOP NOW
*Buy it via the link above and enter the code INAWOMANSBODYXOHNUT for a special discount as part of the IAWB community.
In Conversation with Emily Sauer
Q
Was there a pivotal time in your life that made you decide to stop having painful sex?
A

When I started looking for products, there were none that understood the experience I was going through. After finding essentially nothing, I had no one to blame but myself, so for the 10 years I was experiencing it I stopped trying to advocate for myself.

Just before I created Ohnut, I was in a relationship in which every time that sex was painful it was a reminder to me that I wasn’t the person I thought I was or the partner I wanted to be and I lost every sense of self that I took pride in.

Fortunately, we were dedicated to trying to make it work and in that process the idea of customizing penetration depth was really the only option that I had. And so, when I created Ohnut and used it, I suddenly had this deep sense of liberation, because when suddenly that pain went away it was as if with it came a permission to feel good.

Ultimately, it was that moment of liberation that gave me the permission to talk about my experience.

“ It’s important to mention that 75% of people will have painful sex during their lifetime and less than half speak about it with their partner. ” 
Q
You have just talked a bit about this, but could you tell us more about how not having painful sex has changed your relationship with your sexuality?
A

I learned that to deny the fact that sex is complicated is to deny the fact that we’re humans.

Sex is not just a physical experience. My mental health, my self-esteem, my quality of life are deeply impacted by my sexual existence and the other way around. I think that it is deeply unfortunate that our society and medical institutions don’t feel the same way.

In my relationships after I began to use Ohnut, there was no way I was entering into a relationship where the person didn’t know I was having pain during sex. This made it so that from that moment on there was an open dialogue not only about my body but also about my partner’s body.

All of a sudden, when I was able to express my insecurities and my concerns, this created room for my partner to also say, ‘This is what I am trying to work on and this is what might not work well’, and it opened up the possibility for both of us to be human in the bedroom, rather than having to perform.

Q
What do you think keeps people from talking about their discomfort during sex?
A

It’s important to mention that 75% of people will have painful sex during their lifetime and less than half speak about it with their partner.

I think that when you look for products that can solve it and there aren’t, you go to a doctor and they cannot give you a solution, you look at media and they are only talking about orgasms and not
about this, you feel that you are the only one experiencing it. I mean, how are we supposed to feel about ourselves when this is what we see around us?

All of this makes it really hard for people to know that it is actually a shared experience and,
ultimately, to speak about it.

To deny the fact that sex is complicated is to deny the fact that we’re humans. ” 
Q
What would you say to women reading this and who are experiencing pain during sex?
A

After a decade of not advocating for myself, I developed the habit of being silent in the bedroom and outside of it. To this day I don’t always say something when sex is painful because it’s still hard for me, and I feel really bad about it.

I would like to tell them that what they are experiencing is not uncommon and the important thing is that there are people that can help them, so they don’t have to feel in this way forever.

Q
In your opinion, what steps does society need to take to move in the right direction regarding female sexuality?
A
I think it is going to take a long time for systemic change to happen so it’s up to individuals to become educated and to advocate for themselves.
Have your needs met, a toolkit for more comfortable sex
Image
Ohnut, a wearable for when penetrative sex feels too deep.
SHOP NOW
*Buy it via the link above and enter the code INAWOMANSBODYXOHNUT for a special discount as part of the IAWB community.
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